Category: 3DS Max

Solidworks Aston Martin One-77 by Romain Genistou

Solidworks Aston Martin One-77 by Romain Genistou

Sunday, February 11, 2018 | By | Add a Comment

 

Solidworks Aston Martin One-77 by Romain Genistou

Hello again, and boy has it been a long and busy several months for me.  I have had many changes as well as obstacles to overcome along with the coming of the new year and I am hoping for a bit more smoother sailing in the months to come.  So with that said, I am looking forward to getting back on track with my posts.  I hope all of you are having a wonderful new year and I also want to thank all of my dedicated readers out there for returning again and again to see what new and interesting insights there are in the world of modern technological design and entertainment.

Lately, I have completed a variety of Solidworks tutorials and I would like to share them with you.  One tutorial in particular is the Aston Martin One-77 body modeling tutorial by Romain Genistou.

I found this tutorial to be full of surprises, and it leaned towards the more complicated and challenging of car body modeling tutorials I have worked on as of yet.  While most Solidworks tutorials I have come across seem to be a step-by-step, hand-in-hand walkthrough of the complete tutorial; this tutorial made you strap on your thinking cap from time to time.  I found this true when especially working with the PDF version of this tutorial.

The creator of this tutorial, Romain Genistou, has a website named Solidworks Insight at www.solidworks-insight.com.  This website has a few wonderful introductory tutorials for the Solidworks student.  Most of the tutorials on this site are free, however, there are a couple that require you to pay in order to complete the tutorial in its entirity.

And so it comes to happen that Romain and Jan from www.learnsolidworks.com decided to meet and together they revised the tutorial in its entirity before  I had originally purchased the PDF version of this tutorial from Solidworks Insight before Romain and Jan collaborated on the LearnSolidworks.com edition, and I found that version to be incorrect in some areas of the design as well as missing important steps and information.  This was particularly noticeable in things like designing projected curves and connecting areas of the rear bumper area.  The LearnSolidworks.com tutorial is much more polished and goes into a bit more detail on certain questionable areas of the design.

There are certain areas of the newer version that need a bit more clarification, such as working with boundary and filled surfaces and the parameters which determine what is the best method to use between the two.  Also, there was not a great amount of detail on knitting surfaces in the model.  When modeling the Audi R8, there was quite an amount surface knitting involved, and the tutorial (although long), felt much more thorough and professionally complete.  I found myself referencing the R8 tutorial for a variety of areas including working with assemblies and making the construction lines for the vehicles axles and wheel placement.

The Aston Martin One-77 tutorial is now available on www.learnsolidworks.com for a price of 347 euro, but for a novice designer who is interested in vehicle body modeling, the information and instruction you receive is invaluable.

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

Sunday, October 29, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

I have been playing my share of alpha games lately, and one game I find particularly addicting is Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr.  I am not particularly fond of alpha games, although there are sometimes those games that you just know have a better than average degree of growing into something fun and satisfying for a good many season.  And those are the games worth playing.  So where does Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr stand?  I, myself, have not been much of a Warhammer fan up until this point.  I never really purchased or played any other Warhammer games except Space Marine, which I thought was good, although I played it on a friends Xbox and just briefly before going home and playing more recent and better games on my PC.  The other Warhammer games are mostly strategic turn based games which I am not much of a fan of.  Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr on the other hand might have a more promising lifespan than the others, and here’s why:

In the game you are an Inquisitor which is a brutal and powerful character class from the Warhammer 40K universe that’s a part of a clandestine police force bent on the fanatical purging of demonic threats.  Set in a space sector created specifically for the game, Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr features two separate modes for you to sink your teeth into: a story mode and an open sandbox mode called the Inquisitorial Campaign.

While unorthodox for an action-RPG to be split in such a way, the decision was an intentional one to help differentiate the various aspects of Martyr’s gameplay, to better capture the spirit of the Inquisitor class while giving you a choice over what type of content you wish to tackle. Fortunately, you’re free to switch between them, but according to the game’s lead writer Viktor Juhász, it’s recommended to play story mode first.

“The story mode in Martyr is a traditional single player experience that serves as an overall introduction to the 40K universe, the Inquisitor as a class, and the new mechanics we are going to implement differently from the Van Helsing series,” Juhász told me during a recent interview. “But if you’d like, you can start with the Inquisitorial Campaign.”

 Compared to the story mode’s more contained structure–which puts you in an Alien-like horror scenario where you investigate an ancient spaceship–the Inquisitorial Campaign is a sandbox mode built for a more dynamic gameplay experience, focusing more on the various activities that the Inquisitor also participates in within the 40K universe.
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Playable with up to four players, the Inquisitorial Campaign allows you to freely explore the game’s massive sector, complete randomly-generated missions, and experience a narrative specifically triggered by the actions you take. Additionally, the game features a base building element where you can create your own personal fortress and invade ones built by other players online. But since the Inquisitorial Campaign offers you the freedom to explore the sector as you please, it lacks a difficulty curve, making it tougher than the story mode.

The game, which has been in Alpha testing since its release in February, has its drawbacks, including the fact that it is incredibly slow and choppy at times.  It makes you wonder if the game is on the verge of crashing from a lack of memory or lag.  Also the cover system, which they like to herald as a brilliant new thing to the action RPG, is very slow in reaction time and does very little to protect against large enemy fire which can decimate your cover objects that take damage until they are destroyed…sometimes hurting you in the process.

The game, however, is still in development, and I feel that there are benefits to some of the problems that the game currently has.  For one, it gives the game more of a challenge to advance, even for those who are expert action RPG gamers, and this allows novice gamers to get good at the game and start the early stages of the game with a very good foothold before the game is released in Beta.  Also, the game has a dedicated team of developers who have created a wonderful interface to record the issues with the game, and all of this is listed on redirected active forum pages which no doubt are checked regurlarly.  So you can count on improvements as time progresses within the games mechanics and speed.

So, what is so promising about Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr?  In my opinion, the fact that the players are apparently supposed to alter the game universe’s storyline, a promising PvP action MMORPG, building and customizing fortresses, a huge plethora of crafting and customizations including vehicles and weapons, and a challenging and much more difficult free multiplayer universe is what we have in store for this game.

Different from Warhammer games we have seen before?  I think so!

May the best Inquisitor win!

Star Citizen: Working towards v3.0

Star Citizen: Working towards v3.0

Sunday, October 1, 2017 | By | Add a Comment


Star Citizen: Working towards v3.0

And now, for the update you’ve all been waiting for….that game which everyone is eagerly awaiting for….Star Citizen 3.0!  Star Citizen 3.0 has been postponed for quite some time now, with its July due date now spreading into October.  There are new worlds, game improvements, ship and vehicle additions, hangar and item additions, new weaponry, and many, many bugs and problems that need to be fixed.  So, when can we expect the release of one of the most anticipated games of the year?  I sure would like to know when I will be able to fly my Constellation Aquila to explore some new worlds, as well as finally play some storyline campaigns as well, instead of the small quests and space racing they have had for many a long year and a long season now.

Here are some words about the 3.0 expansion from the developers:

Like the Star Citizen Alpha numbering change from 1.3 to 2.0 for the move to Large World, with its 64-bit precision and Local Grid physics tech, that allows us to deliver a game of our detail at a solar system scale, 3.0 represents a giant jump in gameplay potential from the code in the 2.x branch. For a start, it will contain about nine months of our main development branch beyond 2.6.x as well as almost two years of Planetary Tech development that the Frankfurt Engine team embarked on in the last half of 2015. The Planetary Tech opens up a whole new landscape (pun intended) for adventure. In the same way that Large World and Physics Grids created new possibilities in gameplay by allowing players to go from walking around a space station to boarding a ship, flying it hundreds of thousands of kilometers, exiting their pilot seat, walking to an airlock, opening it and EVAing over to a derelict station, all from the same point of view, the Planetary Tech takes it one massive leap further. When you see a Planet or Moon, you will be able to fly there, land and explore on foot, or from your ship or a ground vehicle you have brought with you.

3.0 is supposed to open up the Star Citizen universe for the players to explore and begin their adventuring on the available planets with more in production as the game progresses.  Version 3.2 will provide us with more updates and most likely more planets and additions as well.

Here is the link to the original webpage detailing the timeline for the release of Star Citizen 3.0: https://robertsspaceindustries.com/schedule-report.

I don’t know about you other Star Citizeners out there, but I am ready to build my stronghold off of raiding and lots of other nastiness.  Isn’t that what life in a universe is all about?

Happy gaming!

The Wonderfully Chiseled game which is Warframe

The Wonderfully Chiseled game which is Warframe

Sunday, September 24, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

The Wonderfully Chiseled game which is Warframe

Hello everyone, so again it has been some time since I have posted a blog this site.  I deeply apologize to those who have been committed to checking in regularly and disappointed that there has been no activity for some time now.  My computer has once again been in and out of service for a long time with reoccurring problems and some things had to be replaced out of warranty.  So it has taken some time to get the necessary funding and finally get someone to fix it to a workable condition.  So with that said, let us move on to a review of a fun, pretty, and time/money consuming game called Warframe.

Warframe is a sexy game and has a lot to offer in a third person shooter package.  This lovely lady of a game has seen some changes in the recent years since its release in 2013, including accessories and platinum currency which you can purchase on their website through their Prime Access catalog.  It is a fun and addictive game to play and along with the occasional additions to the game, players continue to be drawn back into the arms of this beckoning cash cow.

A little on the game then….Warframe is a cooperative online third person shooter where players take on the role of Tenno, space ninjas in technologically-advanced exoskeletons that give them superhuman powers.  Engage in action-packed combat as you run along walls, go down zip lines, perform acrobatics, and cut down enemies with your sword, or blast them all to kingdom come with the vast arsenal of weapons at your disposal.  While Warframe does have several PvP options, Warframe is primarily a PvE game. Choose from three starting classes and 17 advanced classes, each with their own roles and playstyles.  Work together with friends as you take on armies of space grunts, walking turrets, and hordes of mindless zombies in a stunning futuristic sci-fi world.

Warframe Key Features:

  • Good Variety of Warframes – choose from a large pool of warframes and customize them with mods to match your needs.
  • Smooth Moves – play with familiar FPS controls and use ninja/parkour moves to position yourself.
  • Constant Updates – the dev team is always tweaking and updating the game based on players’ comments.
  • Awesome Graphics and SFX – the graphics are amazingly fluid and the music heightens the action-packed atmosphere of the game.

So, what is it that draws in players after 4 years since its release?

Warframe wasn’t always the sleek time-devouring machine it is now. It launched with significant bumps (as, in fairness, do most online games) but more importantly vanilla Warframe felt a bit feature-light.  Content felt very sectioned off and discrete, progression was pretty hamstrung, and there wasn’t much of a community in which to find other players to jump in with or to answer your questions about some of the game’s more obscure systems.

But that was 2013.  Fast-forward to the present and Warframe is a completely different animal.  The bones are the same, but almost every system of the game has been markedly improved or evolved.  Gameplay is more connected now, so it doesn’t feel like every mission is a stand-alone affair, though the game has retained enough bite-sized content that if you want to just dive in for ten or fifteen minutes that’s perfectly viable. And that core gameplay, the shooting and slicing and leaping that continues to be the best part of Warframe’s layered offerings, feels sleeker than ever.  It’s power fantasy done right, allowing players to feel powerful and dangerous without making the game’s challenges feel trivial.

My Very First Review of Star Citizen

My Very First Review of Star Citizen

Monday, April 10, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

My Very First Review of Star Citizen

Hello again my fellow readers, tonight I am going to do my own personal review of Star Citizen.  I seem to have been introduced to this game a bit late, but those of you who don’t know about this game, let me give you a brief rundown of the game.  The game has been created by the acclaimed game designer Chris Roberts (who helped define the space simulation genre with his Wing Commander and Privateer franchises).  It is of course, set in an entirely different universe which continues to expand as production on the game continues.  The game brings the visceral action of piloting interstellar craft through combat and exploration to a new generation of gamers at a level of fidelity never before seen.  It offers a complete universe where any number of adventures can take place, allowing players to decide their own game experience. Pick up jobs as a smuggler, pirate, merchant, bounty hunter, or enlisted pilot.  A huge sandbox with a complex and deep lore allows players to explore or play in whatever capacity they wish.  Immerse yourself high quality, cutting-edge visuals and technology, a virtual world that is massive and detailed, a sophisticated storyline that is wide in scope, and visceral space combat that will make your heart pound.

You can now play certain features of the game, however, the game itself is still in production, with the developers continuing to set deadlines which have not been met for its completion.  These features include the Persistent Universe Alpha, Arena Commander, and Star Marine.  The Persistent Universe Alpha is the full games universe where you can communicate with other players, access your hangar, and fly around space and complete certain tasks or contracts.  Arena Commander offers PVP space combat, PVE space combat, limited space exploration, and racing.  Star Marine is essentially the alpha first person shooter module of the game.

Squadron 42, which is the introductory first person module for the game is still in development and has not yet been released.  This module was originally intended to be the first part of the game where the player learns to fly and fight in a first person setting without the MMO features of the game, in order to gain citizenship for the games universe.  It has plans to be released sometime in the next year.

The game has beautiful graphics and very fluid and enticing game play.  In order to play the game, you must pledge, or sign up for the game on the developers website and purchase a starter kit and ship.  Ships range anywhere from $45 upward to thousands of dollars and new ships are constantly being developed for the game.

I will continue to post updates regarding the progress of the games development.  I plan on playing this game frequently and to blog my updates on the game as well.  So, until then, why not pledge, pay the $45, and try the game yourselves?  Have fun and I will return soon my space adventurers!

Can we optimize Revit for interference checking?

Can we optimize Revit for interference checking?

Sunday, February 19, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

Can we optimize Revit for interference checking?

Well, people who are not related to construction industry get confused when they hear that Revit can also be used for determining clashes between models.  The reason for that is, normally Navisworks is optimized by AEC professionals for executing clash detection services.  When client companies get to know that clashes between model elements can also be figured out in Revit they are often shocked to hear that.

But the fact remains that, Revit is the most powerful software developed by Autodesk.  It can perform many functions apart from modeling which is its specialty.  For example the software, helps architects and engineers in coordinating multidiscipline models, creating sketches and for providing realistic effects to the models by rendering them.  In fact Revit coordination modeling services have become very popular among AEC professionals now days.

However, its Interference checking feature is very important for design development teams.  Interferences between architecture, structure and MEP models can be easily figured out in Revit by BIM modelers.  First of all, when all the different models are developed by a same company, it becomes very convenient for the multidiscipline design development teams to collaborate with for determining clashes.

Revit users can determine clashes between their own model elements, as well as between multidiscipline models such as between architectural and structural model.

A quite simple method is applied by Revit users to find out clashes.  When clashes are determined within the model elements of a single model, its users simply have to compare the location of various elements.  By comparing their location, engineers can easily understand whether they are colliding with each other or not.  If in case location assigned for a model element does not interfere with the location of other model element that means there are no issues between them.  But if two or more than two model elements interfere with each other’s location that means there is a problem in the design. And hence clashes can be determined easily.

The same formula is applied when it comes to determining clashes between different models.  In this case Revit users are first required to link a model into the host model.  Once the model is linked its users have to compare the locations of the elements of a host model and linked model.  This helps in figuring out whether the model elements of host and linked model are fighting for the same location or not.  If in case they are fighting for a same location that means they are interfering with each other.

In this way Revit users can figure out all the clashes and can eliminate them in time before they could become a serious problem for architects and engineers.