Tag: construction

Revit Architecture

Revit Architecture

Saturday, February 25, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

RKO backlot main hotel views

RKO backlot main hotel views (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Revit Architecture

Those of us who know anything about BIM or Building Information Modeling know how much of an oh-so-joyous happy dandy fun time Revit Architecture can be.  With its tendencies for the user to have to be highly accurate in the development of a structure without having the ability to adjust measurements manually, Revit can be an extremely time consuming and often excruciatingly painstaking program to design fully developed construction in.

Rendering can be a whole other monster to deal with in itself.  Any project with a significant amount of At the school where I learned my Revit skills, we have wonderful 2 core processor Dell desktops which pretty much are good for doing a percentage of the floor plan work and unless you have several hours to spare, then forget about rendering big projects.  Especially if animation or 3DS Max plug-ins are used, then you should really expect to be spending a significantly lengthy amount of time rendering your projects.

Of course, now we have cloud-based rendering with the experimental plug-in dubbed Project Neon, located on Autodesk Labs which is in the beta phases and allows for the user to render their images through their Autodesk account instead of locally through their own computers.  But rendering a project is still very time consuming and the use of your Autodesk account is not always available (at such places like certain schools).  It is because of the complexity of the program and the time it takes to create each individual aspect of the entire program that the program in its entirety is not always taken advantage of in the workplace.

Just imagine the incredible and beautifully polished 3D designs that could be showcased during potential project bids in any given circumstance if the software were to develop with simplified convenience in mind.  Nevertheless, Revit still is a remarkable program and it is improving dramatically by the year.  I hope to see the day when rooms are created and developed with much simpler methods and randomly generated components and furniture are brought into the program.  These improvements, including the ability to freely manipulate measurements would make Revit an excellent program to use regularly in the workplace.

Revit Families for Beginners

Revit Families for Beginners

Sunday, January 29, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

Revit Families for Beginners

Many fresh Revit technicians or architects who go through Revit training spend quite a lot of time in understanding the concepts behind developing BIM families.  Understanding the concepts and analyzing the role of Revit families in a particular project is very important.  Creating Revit content or families is vital for every BIM project, regardless of project size or complexity.

How to get there, is the question?  Let us talk about the concept and give beginners an idea of this essential part of BIM.

Revit family and content creation, is considered extremely important in the field of BIM.  Companies aim to develop families in order the maintain a seamless work flow within projects.  What are Revit families and why are they so important?

Basic Overview :
As discussed earlier, families constitute of elements with similar parameters which are the building blocks of a revit model.  Revit families can be simple or parametric in nature.  Parametric families are extremely important and sought after widely owing to its multiple advantages.  Families can be created from scratch depending on building requirements and later modified according to right project environment.

Types of Families:
Revit families can be categorized under Architectural , Structural, HVAC Electrical, Fire protection and Plumbing families.  Ceilings, doors, windows, furniture, fixtures, walls, curtain walls, etc., fall under Architectural Revit families.  Pipes, faucets, tubs, pots, toilets fall under Plumbing category while air diffusers and conduits are developed under HVAC and Electrical categories respectively.  You cannot modify or change the categories available within the Revit software but you can add types of families required.

There can be numerous variants within same family types.  These variants can have different dimensions, material specifications and parameters that differentiate each family variant from another one.  For example a kitchen faucet can have 3 variants, one can be small with a steel finish,  another can be a bit large with a porcelain finish, and one can be an oval shape with a tile finish.  Key concern is the parameter that is used and the values given to them.  The key point to note is that these four variations have the same set of parameters; however, the value of those parameters varies.  Parametric Revit families can be used within any project environment.

Changing or adding parameters is a tricky part.  All Revit modelers need to identify the difference between modifying parameters of family groups and individual families.

Railing Errors in Revit

Railing Errors in Revit

Saturday, May 7, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Railing Errors in Revit

Railing errors in Revit can sometimes be very tricky and not place themselves exactly the way they should in Revit. I found this to especially be the case when working with pipe handrails and when creating a stairway by component and placing the railing in a calculated, uniform manner along the stringers of the host.

In some instances, the problem areas fix themselves with adjusting some of the railing parameters such as baluster placement and handrail height, offset and angled join parameters in the component editing areas. In other cases, the problem is more complicated and requires either re-sketching the entire stairway itself or possibly creating an adaptive railing family.

I found this to be a reoccurring problem when constructing a stairway between two floors where no matter what I seemed to try, the problem remained.  It tends to happen at sharp 90 degree or more acute corners and it results in disconnected and misaligned railing structures.

In the case of the picture you see above, I was not able to find a simple solution to the problem and ended up creating a whole new stairway using a different handrail type than the pipe handrail shown.

It is possible to alter the sketch path of the handrail and add custom balusters around the problem area in order to create a customized warping of the handrail, which may or may not fix the problem, but that often also requires re-sketching the stairway boundary as well.

Another option is to create the railing in separate sections with minimal space between them.  This works well and you can then fill in a customized baluster or wall component in between the separated railing sections.

Revit is a program for the designer at heart, and there are often times where the designer needs to use their creative instincts to devise alternative solutions of overcoming obstacles in the design phases of a building project which would eliminate errors in Revit.

Such is the case with many of the standard features of BIM programs such as Revit.

Incomplete Revit Families

Incomplete Revit Families

Friday, May 6, 2016 | By | Add a Comment



Incomplete Revit Families

When you are working with Revit, you want to make sure great lengths are taken into making sure everything is as complete and organized as possible before completing the final renderings and walkthroughs that will be used to showcase your project to potential buyers and bidders.  So, needless to say, a lot of time and effort must be put into making sure everything is precise in detail and assembled exactly without any errors or discrepancies.

When importing families into Revit, it is often difficult to tell the level of detail or what exactly consists of the family that is imported.  Many family items do not include additional components to give the item a complete realistic look that is necessary for high level presentations.  This often leads to having to also import all the other individual components (if you can find them, especially for use with the version of Revit you may be using) and add them to the main family item you are placing.  Such is the case that I have noticed with many furniture related items that are the files that are included in the Revit databases when the program is downloaded from Autodesk.  This can be extremely time consuming and on a large scale project with many levels, can often take days and weeks to add all of the necessary detail to provide a well polished, impressive presentation of the final project.

Take a look at the bookshelves I have displayed in the pictures above.  The first picture on the upper far right is a stock shelving family that comes with the Autodesk Revit family database files upon download.  The picture of the same shelving unit in the picture of the unit next to a water cooler is pictured with independent book components that were manually placed onto the shelves (which took me an incredible amount of time to do) to give it a more complete, functional look.  I then attempted to copy and past the entire selection of components and place them in various areas of the floor plan and my results were similar to the picture you see of the same shelving unit with missing books.  I found that after multiple attempts of trying to copy and past the entire selection that it continually would not copy and paste all of the books and the shelving unit without many books missing on the shelves.

So, I believe the only solutions are either to: create a custom family of shelving with all of the books placed on the shelves, or to download a pre-made shelving unit from a Revit component website with books placed on the shelves.  The last picture is actually a shelving unit that I found on such a site that was not an accurate model of the picture that was displayed on the site.  So, maybe your best bet would be to create your own family of shelving with books and use that continuously throughout your project in order to save time and have things done correctly the first time!

I hope this helps you in saving many necessary wasted hours that could be used on many other valuable things.  Thanks for reading and please continue to check my blogs regularly for more Revit tips and information.

Adaptive Revit Railing

Adaptive Revit Railing

Tuesday, March 29, 2016 | By | Add a Comment



Adaptive Revit Railing

So lately I have been working on a Revit project that involves the creation of a large corporate office building with attached recreational and exercise facilities, and I came across the difficulty of being able to place a railing on a custom made set of circular concrete stairs that I created to lead up to the set of exterior doors located on both the north and south sides of the east corporate office wing of the building.

So, after many failed attempts of inserting the rail system either by host or sketch, as well as editing the parameters associated with the railing families, I decided my only known option was to attempt to manually create an adaptive railing.  And the outcome is what you see in the pictures above.

This just so happens to be my first attempt ever at making an adaptive component, so I used the video above as my guide.  It is a good video, although it happens to miss some points including how to make a multi-baluster railing as well as how to make the railing in U.S. standard measurements instead of metric.  It is still a very informative video, and a good starting point for anyone who feels the need or inspiration to begin creating adaptive components in Revit.

As you can see, my railing still needs some degree of work to be done.  It is not perfect and I ran across a number of problems including the sloping of the bottom portions of the railing, as well as the irregular ellipse-like balusters.  Also, I need to be able to change the material of the railing as well, so it appearss as the standard dull, anonyomous, greyish material and I have yet to add the material change as a parameter in the family parameters.  But, still not a bad first attempt if I do say so myself.  What do you think?  Be honest.

Revit and 3DS Max Animation

Revit and 3DS Max Animation

Sunday, March 27, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Revit and 3DS Max Animation

Yet another exciting topic in the world of Revit, is importing 3DS Max animation into the project.  This is the essential element for high-profile displays or presenting your Revit structure and it’s walkthroughs to a client for them to get the full experience of visualizing the structure from the inside and out.  Of course, you want your doors to open and your escalators to escalate when you’ve got a multi-million dollar project on the line for a potential bid out.  And it would be even nicer if the people moved and the television screens projected moving pictures too!  So, how does a project designer in Revit get his features animated?

It is all a matter of importing your Revit project into 3DS Max and doing the animation work with the animation tools in 3DS Max, and then doing your final renderings in 3DS Max as well.  But how does a Revit designer import his Revit design into 3DS Max in the first place?  The great thing about Autodesk programs is that it is very easy to link and import and export files from different Autodesk programs into and out of each program.

3DS Max is a 3D program which deals with 3D views and animation, so obviously the file that you would need to import into 3DS Max would be a 3D view of your Revit project.  Once you have selected the view that you wish to import into 3DS Max to manipulate, then you would go into 3DS Max and in the File Menu drop down you will find an Import files selection.  Once you click on this button then you will need to find the location of the Revit file you want to import and select it and open the file.  It may then give you a choice of what view of the file you wish to open the file into, such as external views, side views, or possibly internal views.  Once you have selected the view, then the file should take a moment or two to process into the program and then VIOLA…..the view should then appear before your very eyes!   Not too difficult was that now?  Take a look at the video above for more information and a visual tutorial about what we just discussed!