Tag: cyborg

Semi-Cosplay

Semi-Cosplay

Monday, February 27, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

Semi-Cosplay

Semi-cosplay is what I like to call cosplay that can be considered more of a regular dress and activity than full-on cosplay.  It is not a movement, but just a term I will use to describe those of us who like to wear our favorite outlandish attire or pieces of outlandish attire on a regular basis without feeling too out of place or having to go through great lengths to dress up as well as fit in on a regular basis.

Although many of us who are into cosplay or semi-cosplay tend to have been originally heavy metal rockers, punk rockers, or rivet-heads/ cyberpunks that continue to wear their everyday get-up, some of us change our attire from time to time or have different costumes or looks we like to wear.

Heavy metal rockers and punk rockers are two examples of lifestyles of people who tend to dress with semi-cosplay articles on a regular, all-day-every-day basis, such as studs and spikes , shin and wrist guards, make-up, wigs, and designed pieces of attire.

Most of us like to dress up on our days and nights off when we are with our small group of close friends who partake in such activities while either just relaxing or indulging in some sort of gaming or partying.  Whatever the case, we do it to bring out our true selves, which most of us hide and wear our masks of conformity to adjust to our workday program.

Cosplayers obtain their apparel through many different methods.  Manufacturers produce and sell packaged outfits for use in cosplay, with varying levels of quality.  These costumes are often sold online, but also can be purchased from dealers at conventions.  A number of individuals also work on commission, creating custom costumes, props, or wigs designed and fitted to the individual.

Other cosplayers, who prefer to create their own costumes, still provide a market for individual elements, accessories, and various raw materials, such as unstyled wigs or extensions, hair dye, cloth and sewing notions, liquid latex, body paint, costume jewelry, and prop weapons.

With the advancement in robotic technology, robot or android/cyborg additions are becoming increasingly popular.  Semi-cosplayers or cosplayers often create add-ons that serve no useful purpose other than to make the individual’s costume look cool and unique.  That is the whole idea of being yourself and doing your own thing.

Take a look at the above video for a glimpse of creativity by a designer who created robotic spider shoulder wear and let me know what you think!

Making Molded Helmet Designs

Making Molded Helmet Designs

Sunday, April 3, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

 

Making Molded Helmet Designs

Another recommended accessory for the cosplayer or semi-cosplayer at heart, is, of course, the helmet or head wear.  This often requires making molded helmet designs of your own creation in order to fit your unique alter ego.  Maybe Bruce Wayne wouldn’t care if he were to reveal his identity as Batman as long as his job get’s done, but for the sake of his protection, along with some cool gadgets in his helmet, it is safer for him to don the bat helm.

So, how does the helmet wearing cosplayer or semi-cosplayer go about creating their own headpiece.  Well, there are several ways of doing this, such as creating a CNC manufactured or 3D printed helmet of course.  I am not going to go into great detail about the processes, but I will talk about a process which I am familiar with which involves creating a clay molding for preparation of creating a casted helmet, much like the helmet in the video above.  This way involves hardening clay around a replica of your own head which can be a lifecasting of your head or something that could be used in place which is the same size and formation of your head.

When purchasing a clay for the mold, it is wise to go with NSP clay which is sulfur free clay, since sulfur will react with the curing chemicals in the rubber that is used for the mold, causing the clay to warp and the silicone not to cure properly.  Other clays that may be considered are oil based clays as well.  Always make sure that your floor is protected with some type of floor cover to prevent stains or ruining any carpeted area.

Once you have the clay, then you can start builiding it up in block like formations on the head replica.

Once you have built the clay up to represent the basic blocking of the subject, you can start sculpting it down to get more accurate shapes, contours, and details using finer and more precise tools.

Symmetry on both sides of the helmet is very important for a good looking helmet, just like a good looking head in real life, and I’m sure all the ladies would agree with me there, right?  You can use mineral spirits and a paint brush to smooth out areas and make sculpting easier and cut down on sanding time at the end of the project.

Once you’re satisfied, what you want to do is prep the sculpture for the molding process.  It is good to go over the entire sculpt with a few layers of primer to seal up the clay really good.  It will also take out any small scratches that the brush may have left.  So, now you should have a wonderfully symmetrical molding prepared for the casting process.

I hope you enjoyed learning more about creating a sculpted helmet design, and for more information on casting and casted designs, please take a look at the video above and stay tuned to the same bat website for more blogging on helmet creation in the future!