Tag: helmet

Making Casted Helmet Designs

Making Casted Helmet Designs

Monday, April 25, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Making Casted Helmet Designs

Well hello again my super-stupendously, out-of-this-world cosplayers and cosplayerettes.  I have returned to talk about casting your helmet design out of the molding that I know you all read over and followed closely before viewing this post on your next steps, right?  Of course you did!  So, get your bat heads out of your bat caves and let’s make something to protect your batty noggins from the next batty, bang-up job.

The process we will use to create our casted helmet is called either slush casting or rotocasting and it involves using the molded design we created in the previous post and video.  Smooth Cast 65D is the type of plastic that is used in the video, and it is a very good plastic that is impact resistant, very durable, and is made specifically for rotocasting.  Other plastics that can also be used are Smooth Cast 300 or 320, which also work well too.  The purpose of this type of casting is that the helmet needs to be hollow in the middle and be able to fit on your head, so you can’t just make an entire block of plastic out of a mold.

So, the first steps are to make sure your silicon jackets for the inner portion of the mold where the plastic will be poured into are immaculately clean, so that no dirt or grime will transfer into the casting and ruin it.

The next step is to assemble the mold shell and insert the jackets inside the mold shell and make sure the registration keys on the jackets and shell align.  Take time to line up the silicon jackets and shells accurately so the seam line between them almost disappears.

Next, it is time to mix your plastic resins to prepare for pouring.  Pour equal amounts of the resin materials into plastic disposable cups and then combine those into one large cup.  Add liquid dyes to the resin material to add color to the final product.

After preparing the resin liquid, pour the liquid into your mold and rotate the mold to make sure all surfaces are evenly coated.  The liquid hardens quickly, so you want to continually rotate the mold so the liquid coats and dries evenly.  The drying time depends on the amount of liquid used and the liquid changes shades of color as it dries in order to tell if it is complete.  Continue adding layers in order to increase the thickness of the helmet or finished product.

After adding the desired amount of plastic layers and allowing a substantial amount of time to cure the casting, it is time to demold your casting.  Be careful when removing the silicon jackets from the casting, so they don’t rip or get destroyed in the process.  Most molds produce flashing and lips around the casting which can be removed with your hands, a Dremel tool, and sandpaper or sanding materials.

With the right amount of detail, your end product should be astounding enough to make even Batman proud.  Evil-doers beware!

Making Molded Helmet Designs

Making Molded Helmet Designs

Sunday, April 3, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

 

Making Molded Helmet Designs

Another recommended accessory for the cosplayer or semi-cosplayer at heart, is, of course, the helmet or head wear.  This often requires making molded helmet designs of your own creation in order to fit your unique alter ego.  Maybe Bruce Wayne wouldn’t care if he were to reveal his identity as Batman as long as his job get’s done, but for the sake of his protection, along with some cool gadgets in his helmet, it is safer for him to don the bat helm.

So, how does the helmet wearing cosplayer or semi-cosplayer go about creating their own headpiece.  Well, there are several ways of doing this, such as creating a CNC manufactured or 3D printed helmet of course.  I am not going to go into great detail about the processes, but I will talk about a process which I am familiar with which involves creating a clay molding for preparation of creating a casted helmet, much like the helmet in the video above.  This way involves hardening clay around a replica of your own head which can be a lifecasting of your head or something that could be used in place which is the same size and formation of your head.

When purchasing a clay for the mold, it is wise to go with NSP clay which is sulfur free clay, since sulfur will react with the curing chemicals in the rubber that is used for the mold, causing the clay to warp and the silicone not to cure properly.  Other clays that may be considered are oil based clays as well.  Always make sure that your floor is protected with some type of floor cover to prevent stains or ruining any carpeted area.

Once you have the clay, then you can start builiding it up in block like formations on the head replica.

Once you have built the clay up to represent the basic blocking of the subject, you can start sculpting it down to get more accurate shapes, contours, and details using finer and more precise tools.

Symmetry on both sides of the helmet is very important for a good looking helmet, just like a good looking head in real life, and I’m sure all the ladies would agree with me there, right?  You can use mineral spirits and a paint brush to smooth out areas and make sculpting easier and cut down on sanding time at the end of the project.

Once you’re satisfied, what you want to do is prep the sculpture for the molding process.  It is good to go over the entire sculpt with a few layers of primer to seal up the clay really good.  It will also take out any small scratches that the brush may have left.  So, now you should have a wonderfully symmetrical molding prepared for the casting process.

I hope you enjoyed learning more about creating a sculpted helmet design, and for more information on casting and casted designs, please take a look at the video above and stay tuned to the same bat website for more blogging on helmet creation in the future!