Tag: house

Revit Architecture

Revit Architecture

Saturday, February 25, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

RKO backlot main hotel views

RKO backlot main hotel views (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Revit Architecture

Those of us who know anything about BIM or Building Information Modeling know how much of an oh-so-joyous happy dandy fun time Revit Architecture can be.  With its tendencies for the user to have to be highly accurate in the development of a structure without having the ability to adjust measurements manually, Revit can be an extremely time consuming and often excruciatingly painstaking program to design fully developed construction in.

Rendering can be a whole other monster to deal with in itself.  Any project with a significant amount of At the school where I learned my Revit skills, we have wonderful 2 core processor Dell desktops which pretty much are good for doing a percentage of the floor plan work and unless you have several hours to spare, then forget about rendering big projects.  Especially if animation or 3DS Max plug-ins are used, then you should really expect to be spending a significantly lengthy amount of time rendering your projects.

Of course, now we have cloud-based rendering with the experimental plug-in dubbed Project Neon, located on Autodesk Labs which is in the beta phases and allows for the user to render their images through their Autodesk account instead of locally through their own computers.  But rendering a project is still very time consuming and the use of your Autodesk account is not always available (at such places like certain schools).  It is because of the complexity of the program and the time it takes to create each individual aspect of the entire program that the program in its entirety is not always taken advantage of in the workplace.

Just imagine the incredible and beautifully polished 3D designs that could be showcased during potential project bids in any given circumstance if the software were to develop with simplified convenience in mind.  Nevertheless, Revit still is a remarkable program and it is improving dramatically by the year.  I hope to see the day when rooms are created and developed with much simpler methods and randomly generated components and furniture are brought into the program.  These improvements, including the ability to freely manipulate measurements would make Revit an excellent program to use regularly in the workplace.

Blue Roof Bungalow in AutoCAD 2015

Blue Roof Bungalow in AutoCAD 2015

Wednesday, June 1, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Blue Roof Bungalow in AutoCAD 2015

Well, I stumbled across a wonderfully small and totally eccentric AutoCAD project that is available online at www.IzzCAD.com, which is a Blue Roofed Bungalow style house.  This project was a lot of fun and a good learning experience for anyone who is new to AutoCAD and wants to learn the basics of 3D architectural modeling and drafting.  Downloading the project off of the website costs around $8, but I believe the price is absolutely worth it, since you get videos and tutorials of this project along with tutorials and videos of an office layout project, and two other wonderfully designed, completed house project drawings as well.

I would like to mention that the videos for the house project are incomplete, and there are times where it is up to the imagination of the designer to fill in the blanks, so to say.  Also, the project design was created in metric measurements, and the videos and tutorials are shown using metric measurements as well.  But, anybody who is new to AutoCAD will learn relatively quickly that it is essential in architectural drafting and modeling to set up your drawing measurements or UNITS, previous to beginning any design or line work in the program.

The tutorials show the beginner how to this as well as other basic preparation commands and setup parameters that are involved with initializing an architectural design drawing, such as creating a title block for your project layout.

Another topic of interest that the tutorials focused a lot on is roof inclination and taper calculations.  The important number to have for setting the angle of your project’s roof is the degree of taper, which is the number that you input into your taper angle command when you extrude your roof design.  This is a simple calculation, but it is essential to have the roof inclination angle number, so that you can subtract it from 90 degrees to come up with the degree of taper for your roof.  But, a lot can be learned from these simple tutorials, and this information can prove valuable in future drafting or modeling endeavors.

AutoCAD 3D Cottage

AutoCAD 3D Cottage

Thursday, May 26, 2016 | By | Add a Comment


AutoCAD 3D Cottage

Hello everybody, I just recently completed a fun little AutoCAD project that I wanted to share with you, which is an AutoCAD 3D Cottage.  It is a simple design and the materials and textures involved in the project make it look like an old, rustic, mountain getaway cottage.  It is a fun little day project and it is good practice for anyone who is into graphic design or drafting and design to work with and learn some fundamental tools and capabilities of the program.

The tutorials, which are shown above, are very nicely presented (maybe with the exception of the music), and are very thorough and detailed compared with most tutorials and videos of this nature that you will find on video streaming services such as YouTube.  Yet, as it is with many tutorials you find online, there are also a couple of problem areas that I came across while following the procedures, and I would like to share these with you.

The first is the IMPRINT command, which was used in the video to merge the outline of the foot path to the ground area in front of the cottage in order to form a combined entity with divided face features for pasting the grass and rock materials to their designated areas.  This command did not work the way it was shown in the video at all, and I was left to design my own extruded foot path and move the created foot path extrusion into place.

The second problem area is applying the rock material to the bottom foundation sides of the cottage.  As you can see from my pictures, the rock material resulted in vertical lines on left and right sides of the cottage, as compared to what the rock material was supposed to look like in the front and back sides.  I tried to change the sample and offset settings for the material image, as well as rotating the material image and bump texture image as well, but to no avail.  Maybe if I had messed around a little bit more with the material properties, I might have come up with a solution, but the resulting rendering of the cottage shows the stripes on the left and right sides.  Maybe we can pretend that it has wood siding on the left and right foundation sides for now!

Also, I did not complete the tutuorial in its entirety and added the ground leaves that are shown in the tutorial in my project.  But, the end result still came out looking not too bad.  Maybe there are some grizzly, log cabin, mountain pioneer drafters out there that can out do me.  Whatdya think?

Working with Google Earth Images in AutoCAD

Working with Google Earth Images in AutoCAD

Monday, May 23, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Working with Google Earth Images in AutoCAD

Something that I think all CAD drafters have a difficult time with in the beginning is importing a Google map image into AutoCAD and georeferencing it.  This is an important topic for CAD users, particularly for those involved in subject like town planning, mapping etc.  There is no direct tool in AutoCAD to do this, but there are CAD overlays to do what you want and they are to be used along with AutoCAD for such map conversions.

First Save the Google map what you want to sketch in AutoCAD as raster file format.  Load the raster file in CAD overlay and it will give you a vectro based .dxf file.  Open that in AutoCAD and work on it and save it in DWG format.  Please note that with a perfect CAD overlay software you may be able to make 90 % perfect vector DXF output.  You can use a free download CAD overlay, but it will convert your raster map into only 50 % perfect vector output.  But no issues, open the .dxf or the output from CAD overlay in AutoCAD.  Now start joining all the broken entities as single entity by redrawing or commands like PEDIT use can make those line and some overlays will not produce Text, Hatches as Text or Hatch Entities.  In that case, just type those Texts and Hatched alone and with some bonus tools you can make this fast also.  Then save the vector map file in DWG format and there you have it.

Some of the more recent CAD overlay software act as add-ins to the AutoCAD program to simplify these procedures and create better vector DXF output.  Some of these programs include Plex Earth and CAD-Earth.  It is also becoming increasingly common to find geo-spatial information contained in KML or KMZ files, used by Google Earth, produced by private users or by the administrative authority, and importing such files in AutoCAD has become a necessity.  In this case you will need a KML or KMZ file converter software or data provider such as Spatial Manager.

Railing Errors in Revit

Railing Errors in Revit

Saturday, May 7, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Railing Errors in Revit

Railing errors in Revit can sometimes be very tricky and not place themselves exactly the way they should in Revit. I found this to especially be the case when working with pipe handrails and when creating a stairway by component and placing the railing in a calculated, uniform manner along the stringers of the host.

In some instances, the problem areas fix themselves with adjusting some of the railing parameters such as baluster placement and handrail height, offset and angled join parameters in the component editing areas. In other cases, the problem is more complicated and requires either re-sketching the entire stairway itself or possibly creating an adaptive railing family.

I found this to be a reoccurring problem when constructing a stairway between two floors where no matter what I seemed to try, the problem remained.  It tends to happen at sharp 90 degree or more acute corners and it results in disconnected and misaligned railing structures.

In the case of the picture you see above, I was not able to find a simple solution to the problem and ended up creating a whole new stairway using a different handrail type than the pipe handrail shown.

It is possible to alter the sketch path of the handrail and add custom balusters around the problem area in order to create a customized warping of the handrail, which may or may not fix the problem, but that often also requires re-sketching the stairway boundary as well.

Another option is to create the railing in separate sections with minimal space between them.  This works well and you can then fill in a customized baluster or wall component in between the separated railing sections.

Revit is a program for the designer at heart, and there are often times where the designer needs to use their creative instincts to devise alternative solutions of overcoming obstacles in the design phases of a building project which would eliminate errors in Revit.

Such is the case with many of the standard features of BIM programs such as Revit.

Incomplete Revit Families

Incomplete Revit Families

Friday, May 6, 2016 | By | Add a Comment



Incomplete Revit Families

When you are working with Revit, you want to make sure great lengths are taken into making sure everything is as complete and organized as possible before completing the final renderings and walkthroughs that will be used to showcase your project to potential buyers and bidders.  So, needless to say, a lot of time and effort must be put into making sure everything is precise in detail and assembled exactly without any errors or discrepancies.

When importing families into Revit, it is often difficult to tell the level of detail or what exactly consists of the family that is imported.  Many family items do not include additional components to give the item a complete realistic look that is necessary for high level presentations.  This often leads to having to also import all the other individual components (if you can find them, especially for use with the version of Revit you may be using) and add them to the main family item you are placing.  Such is the case that I have noticed with many furniture related items that are the files that are included in the Revit databases when the program is downloaded from Autodesk.  This can be extremely time consuming and on a large scale project with many levels, can often take days and weeks to add all of the necessary detail to provide a well polished, impressive presentation of the final project.

Take a look at the bookshelves I have displayed in the pictures above.  The first picture on the upper far right is a stock shelving family that comes with the Autodesk Revit family database files upon download.  The picture of the same shelving unit in the picture of the unit next to a water cooler is pictured with independent book components that were manually placed onto the shelves (which took me an incredible amount of time to do) to give it a more complete, functional look.  I then attempted to copy and past the entire selection of components and place them in various areas of the floor plan and my results were similar to the picture you see of the same shelving unit with missing books.  I found that after multiple attempts of trying to copy and past the entire selection that it continually would not copy and paste all of the books and the shelving unit without many books missing on the shelves.

So, I believe the only solutions are either to: create a custom family of shelving with all of the books placed on the shelves, or to download a pre-made shelving unit from a Revit component website with books placed on the shelves.  The last picture is actually a shelving unit that I found on such a site that was not an accurate model of the picture that was displayed on the site.  So, maybe your best bet would be to create your own family of shelving with books and use that continuously throughout your project in order to save time and have things done correctly the first time!

I hope this helps you in saving many necessary wasted hours that could be used on many other valuable things.  Thanks for reading and please continue to check my blogs regularly for more Revit tips and information.