Tag: Massively multiplayer online game

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

Sunday, October 29, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

I have been playing my share of alpha games lately, and one game I find particularly addicting is Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr.  I am not particularly fond of alpha games, although there are sometimes those games that you just know have a better than average degree of growing into something fun and satisfying for a good many season.  And those are the games worth playing.  So where does Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr stand?  I, myself, have not been much of a Warhammer fan up until this point.  I never really purchased or played any other Warhammer games except Space Marine, which I thought was good, although I played it on a friends Xbox and just briefly before going home and playing more recent and better games on my PC.  The other Warhammer games are mostly strategic turn based games which I am not much of a fan of.  Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr on the other hand might have a more promising lifespan than the others, and here’s why:

In the game you are an Inquisitor which is a brutal and powerful character class from the Warhammer 40K universe that’s a part of a clandestine police force bent on the fanatical purging of demonic threats.  Set in a space sector created specifically for the game, Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr features two separate modes for you to sink your teeth into: a story mode and an open sandbox mode called the Inquisitorial Campaign.

While unorthodox for an action-RPG to be split in such a way, the decision was an intentional one to help differentiate the various aspects of Martyr’s gameplay, to better capture the spirit of the Inquisitor class while giving you a choice over what type of content you wish to tackle. Fortunately, you’re free to switch between them, but according to the game’s lead writer Viktor Juhász, it’s recommended to play story mode first.

“The story mode in Martyr is a traditional single player experience that serves as an overall introduction to the 40K universe, the Inquisitor as a class, and the new mechanics we are going to implement differently from the Van Helsing series,” Juhász told me during a recent interview. “But if you’d like, you can start with the Inquisitorial Campaign.”

 Compared to the story mode’s more contained structure–which puts you in an Alien-like horror scenario where you investigate an ancient spaceship–the Inquisitorial Campaign is a sandbox mode built for a more dynamic gameplay experience, focusing more on the various activities that the Inquisitor also participates in within the 40K universe.
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Playable with up to four players, the Inquisitorial Campaign allows you to freely explore the game’s massive sector, complete randomly-generated missions, and experience a narrative specifically triggered by the actions you take. Additionally, the game features a base building element where you can create your own personal fortress and invade ones built by other players online. But since the Inquisitorial Campaign offers you the freedom to explore the sector as you please, it lacks a difficulty curve, making it tougher than the story mode.

The game, which has been in Alpha testing since its release in February, has its drawbacks, including the fact that it is incredibly slow and choppy at times.  It makes you wonder if the game is on the verge of crashing from a lack of memory or lag.  Also the cover system, which they like to herald as a brilliant new thing to the action RPG, is very slow in reaction time and does very little to protect against large enemy fire which can decimate your cover objects that take damage until they are destroyed…sometimes hurting you in the process.

The game, however, is still in development, and I feel that there are benefits to some of the problems that the game currently has.  For one, it gives the game more of a challenge to advance, even for those who are expert action RPG gamers, and this allows novice gamers to get good at the game and start the early stages of the game with a very good foothold before the game is released in Beta.  Also, the game has a dedicated team of developers who have created a wonderful interface to record the issues with the game, and all of this is listed on redirected active forum pages which no doubt are checked regurlarly.  So you can count on improvements as time progresses within the games mechanics and speed.

So, what is so promising about Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr?  In my opinion, the fact that the players are apparently supposed to alter the game universe’s storyline, a promising PvP action MMORPG, building and customizing fortresses, a huge plethora of crafting and customizations including vehicles and weapons, and a challenging and much more difficult free multiplayer universe is what we have in store for this game.

Different from Warhammer games we have seen before?  I think so!

May the best Inquisitor win!

Star Citizen: Working towards v3.0

Star Citizen: Working towards v3.0

Sunday, October 1, 2017 | By | Add a Comment


Star Citizen: Working towards v3.0

And now, for the update you’ve all been waiting for….that game which everyone is eagerly awaiting for….Star Citizen 3.0!  Star Citizen 3.0 has been postponed for quite some time now, with its July due date now spreading into October.  There are new worlds, game improvements, ship and vehicle additions, hangar and item additions, new weaponry, and many, many bugs and problems that need to be fixed.  So, when can we expect the release of one of the most anticipated games of the year?  I sure would like to know when I will be able to fly my Constellation Aquila to explore some new worlds, as well as finally play some storyline campaigns as well, instead of the small quests and space racing they have had for many a long year and a long season now.

Here are some words about the 3.0 expansion from the developers:

Like the Star Citizen Alpha numbering change from 1.3 to 2.0 for the move to Large World, with its 64-bit precision and Local Grid physics tech, that allows us to deliver a game of our detail at a solar system scale, 3.0 represents a giant jump in gameplay potential from the code in the 2.x branch. For a start, it will contain about nine months of our main development branch beyond 2.6.x as well as almost two years of Planetary Tech development that the Frankfurt Engine team embarked on in the last half of 2015. The Planetary Tech opens up a whole new landscape (pun intended) for adventure. In the same way that Large World and Physics Grids created new possibilities in gameplay by allowing players to go from walking around a space station to boarding a ship, flying it hundreds of thousands of kilometers, exiting their pilot seat, walking to an airlock, opening it and EVAing over to a derelict station, all from the same point of view, the Planetary Tech takes it one massive leap further. When you see a Planet or Moon, you will be able to fly there, land and explore on foot, or from your ship or a ground vehicle you have brought with you.

3.0 is supposed to open up the Star Citizen universe for the players to explore and begin their adventuring on the available planets with more in production as the game progresses.  Version 3.2 will provide us with more updates and most likely more planets and additions as well.

Here is the link to the original webpage detailing the timeline for the release of Star Citizen 3.0: https://robertsspaceindustries.com/schedule-report.

I don’t know about you other Star Citizeners out there, but I am ready to build my stronghold off of raiding and lots of other nastiness.  Isn’t that what life in a universe is all about?

Happy gaming!

Dark Souls 3 Review

Dark Souls 3 Review

Sunday, November 13, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Dark Souls 3 Review

Hello again my faithful readers, it seems like I have been having a lot of difficulties for a while now with my website.  I again apologize for these inconveniences as I am in the process of switching over my website from my old domain name at anelevatedexistance.com to anelevatedexistence.online.  I have had a lot of off-time as a result of connection and access errors, along with lengthy internet shutdowns and a huge amount of other problems as well.  I want to personally thank my dedicated readers for sticking with my site, and I sincerely hope to regain my lost audience in the weeks and months ahead.  So, with that said, I expect to be back on track with routine blogging now, and I deeply hope that there should be smoother sailing in the days ahead.

With that said, today I would like to do a review of Dark Souls 3.  Yes that oh, so grand sequel to Dark Souls 1 & 2.  And if you don’t know what I am talking about then I assume that you haven’t played Dark Souls before and therefore you probably don’t play video games either.  Or maybe you don’t keep up with current games (like I sometimes do),  and you have been drifting in outer space for some time.  I would imagine that even so, you would probably still have heard that Dark Souls 3 was released through some humanly way of others making sure that you at least hear the name a billion times.  That is what we call today’s lighting fast advertising and marketing my friends.  They want you to buy the game…..you must buy the game.  Must buy game.   Must buy game.  Must buy game.  Dark Souls 3.  Dark Souls 3.  Dark Souls 3…..  So now that it has been programmed into your minds, let us continue.

So, I bought Dark Souls 3 and played it for about a week or so, and then….guess what.  I am someone who like many, many others, got penalized for absolutely no fault of my own.  Yes, people are paying that $60 or so dollars (even more if you buy the Ashes of Ariandel DLC along with the base game, all at once) just to quickly find that (out of no fault of their own) they are unable to play on the regular servers for Dark Souls 3.  This does not mean that they are unable to continue to play the game, but it means that they are now only able to play on the server with other cheaters and with limited multiplayer play.  This of course, makes the game significantly lousy (unless you are one of those who like to look watch all the pretty colors and effects), and often impossible to beat bosses and other malicious, ridiculously high-powered cheaters, and continue onward.  I do know, however, that there is a way to get past the penalization, if you are able to go back to the beginning and retrieve the Way of the White Circlet.  But, that is all I am willing to say as I decided instead to drop the game for the time being, and I have not done that yet and I don’t like spoiling games for others and giving undeserving people information that they really should figure out on their own.  Right?!?!?!?!?!?!!!!!!!!!  Me thinks so, yes! Puahaharkinaharkinahardyharrrrrrrherrrrrrrrrrrberrrrrrrrrrrrberrrrrrrrrrrrmerrrrrrrrrrrrr.

I will say that for the time I did play it, it was much like the first and second game.  Enjoyable, difficult and a considerable time waster (whether fun or not, is up to the player and their ability to play Dark Souls, right?).  So, just like Dark Souls and its successor, it is much of the same game play and slow progress.  Their are some new features to the final installment in the Dark Souls series, such as dual-wielding, the need to switch weaponry to gain the ability to defeat harder opponents and bosses, stance switching which will allow the player to do special maneuvers that will do special damage to enemies, and hiding enemies which hide around corners and behind objects and wait to attack.

Yay!!!!!  Dark Souls 3.  Buy.  Game.  Bye.

Elite Dangerous Review

Elite Dangerous Review

Sunday, June 19, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Elite Dangerous Review

Elite Dangerous is a game that originally was released in 1984 and has been significantly revised with many additions and a multiplayer game setting included with its original single player feel.  The game has progressed since its release in 2014, but it has had its share of problems and still does.  These problems are mostly the result of a poor “background simulation” where the galaxy’s economy and politics evolve, as well as the lack of being able to form huge intergalactic alliances and join thriving corporations.

The overall goal of the game is to advance your rankings to the titular “elite” status. You have three such rankings: one for your performance in combat, one for trading, and one for exploration. Each ranking starts out at the lowest level—your combat rank is “Harmless,” your trading rank is “Penniless,” and your exploration rank is “Aimless.” To gain rank, you fight, trade, or explore. These three rankings encapsulate the three main “paths” of the game—there are lots of things to do, but they all come down to either fighting, trading, or exploring.

Players looking to form up in large-scale alliances or corporations like in (the biggest space MMORPG to date) EVE will be disappointed, because Elite Dangerous doesn’t have that.  Players looking for spaceships that conform to traditional MMORPG roles (healer, tank, caster, and so on) will be similarly disappointed—not only can you not form player groups larger than four ships, but the ships also don’t necessarily align to traditional MMORPG classes.

Elite Dangerous is nothing more than it advertises itself as being: an up-to-date modernized version of the 1984 original title.  It is first and foremost about the experience of being one pilot physically sitting in a cockpit, and the entire game is geared around that conceit.  It is not and will never be about fleet actions or raids or players flying capital ships passing along orders.  There’s no automatic docking or automatic pilot, the ships in Elite Dangerous are all hands-on, all the time, with often severe consequences for not staying focused.

Elite Dangerous is a beautiful game and an amazing space sim let down by a universe devoid of character and low on excitement.  It’s great to fly the various ships and experiment with different loadouts, and there are a lot of different roles to play in Elite Dangerous that helps keep the experience fresh. But without any special missions or narrative threads to pick up, and a universe that seems more mechanical than alive, Elite Dangerous also seems far smaller than its 400 billion star systems.

Shadowrun Online Games

Shadowrun Online Games

Sunday, May 15, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Dice six sided for the role-playing game Shadowrun

Dice six sided for the role-playing game Shadowrun (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Shadowrun Online Games

It seems that every big name Hollywood movie series and every big name pen and paper role playing game have merged into a modern day conglomeration of money making productions.  As a person who has been a huge gamer for most of my life, I always view these things as the greatest catastrophes ever.  I believe I share these sentiments with a growing majority of gamers as well as it seems that these always turn out to become absolute flops that we like to believe do not really exist and avoid like the plague.  This tends to be the case with the extremely limited video games that represent the extremely unlimited pen and paper role playing games.

As a player of mainly science fiction role playing games, one of my favorite role playing games happens to be Shadowrun.  The video game release of Shadowrun for the XBox 360 was an absolute, completely horrid failure of a game.  The game, which was a shooter type game and had incredibly bad graphics, effects, and design even for its time, involved characters with relatively no character customization and extremely minimal weapons and spells who ran around extremely small areas and fought each other in order to capture flag like items in a race for time.

So, after playing this utter monstrosity of a game, I came under the illusion that when the recent catalog of Shadowrun online games became available, the new games had to be so much better than the previous games turned out to be as a result of the rising demands that critics are now placing on video game developers.  So, I have played a little bit of Shadowrun Returns, which I have purchased for my Android phone and Shadowrun Chronicles: Boston Lockdown, which I have for my home computer.

I am still quite disappointed in the new games, as they are turned based games and not something new like a combination of action and turned based games which I was hoping for.  Character customization seems to be good with the ability to gather more accessories throughout the game to design your character however way you want.  The storylines and quests seem to be lacking in depth, and although I have only played a few hours on the games so far, the missions seem rather quick and too easily won.

Maybe with time I will be able to appreciate the games a little bit more, but as far as graphics and the turned based game layout of the game goes…..I stand disappointed.

Glitches in Video Gaming

Glitches in Video Gaming

Sunday, April 10, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Glitches in Video Gaming

One, if not the greatest hatred of all gamers is the video game glitch.  In this day in age, there are many things that people can not and shout not get away with.  With the information age upon us, and money becoming a more and more difficult thing to acquire, people should by all means get exactly what they pay for.  Video games, especially online games, are absolutely no exception to the rule.  People who play video games definitely know better than to think that there isn’t someone, somewhere working for a game company who is in charge of continual testing and working out glitches on a round the clock, day and night schedule.

I recently purchased the game Mad Max through Steam.  For those of you who don’t know what Steam is, it is an online gaming emporium and gaming engine.  After completing many quests and leveling up my character to a more than favorable level for the area of play, which of course happens to be a particular trend of mine, I experienced a game stopping glitch during a boss fight that caused me to stop playing games for many a month with a fervid disgust.

This glitch also occurred during the holidays, when I had nothing else I could do but to be with my family and around screaming kids all day and night long.  So, needless to say, I was not a happy camper, or should I say happy gamer….or happy camping gamer…..however you want to look at it, and my holidays were ruined.

I tried playing the game recently, about a week ago, but I found that the last place the game had saved was quite a ways back from the previous progress I had made to the boss fight and once again I stopped playing the game in fervid disgust.

So, where is the instantaneous technical support when you need it, and why do these games glitch and fail to work when they are tested out more than professionally, but religiously on a daily basis?

In theory, every video game should be playable until the end.  If players have the sheer dexterity with finger and thumb-power to make their way through an epic journey and defeat a final boss, they should be handsomely rewarded, even if it’s only with a splash screen without a glitch.

Unfortunately, still many video games ship with glitches that make them either impassable or just outright ridiculous.  These have destroyed perfectly good games, and should have cost some programmers their jobs.