Tag: RPG

An Introduction to Starfinder Character Creation

An Introduction to Starfinder Character Creation

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

 

An Introduction to Starfinder Character Creation

Well, Pathfinder is here and what an interesting game it is!  Character creation is of course is the fundamental part of any role playing campaign, so I would like to start my long (but hopefully inspiring) critique of Starfinder with that.  So let’s just dive right in to this long awaited hearty meal with the important things first:

Characters in Starfinder have many familiar elements from Pathfinder, but there are differences. For example, characters don’t just have a race and a class, they have race/class/theme. They do, however, have the six attributes we all know and love – Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma (a point buy is the default method of picking these).

Typical of other science fiction based role playing games outside of the fantasy genre, Starfinder does not use hit points in the same way as D&D/Pathfinder. Rather, a character has both hit points and stamina points. Stamina points are lost first, and are relatively easily recoverable (characters have Resolve points to spend every day, and spending a point refreshes all Stamina. Hit points lost represents actual damage to the character, and is harder to heal. Characters gain both hit points and stamina points every level based on character class (characters also get a one-time HP boost from their race).

Leveling up will be familiar to Pathfinder fans. It is still literally leveling up, from 1st to 20th. Following in the refinements of Pathfinder, Starfinder makes sure that characters are getting something new at every level from every class. In addition to class-specific benefits, characters gets a feat every other level, an ability score increase every fifth level, and a theme benefit every sixth level. Multiclassing exists, but is disfavored.

There are seven standard races available, plus several “legacy” races. The legacy races – dwarves, elves, gnomes, half-elves, half-orcs, and halflings – are perfectly playable, are simply not given the same prominence in Starfinder. Some, like the elves, have a relatively limited presence in the setting, voluntarily isolating themselves. But others, like the halflings, are almost as widespread as humanity. Each race gets one page with mechanics and two portraits, and one page of setting information. The seven standard races are:

  • Human: you know what these guys are, right? As with Pathfinder, they get to pick their attribute bonus, and start with an extra feat and get more skill points. These are the same humans who originated on Golarion.
  • Android: As androids are often wont to do, these ones were created as servitors but more recently have been recognized as sentient beings with rights (well, at least they have in the Pact Worlds). They are constructs and have some environmental immunities, have good vision, sometimes have a tough time communicating when it comes to emotions, and can upgrade their bodies as if it was armor. They are nimble and smart, but not very charismatic.
  • Lashunta: Originating in the Golarion system, the lashuntas are near-human in appearance, but with long antenna (they are not insectile). They are mildly telepathic, have a handful of cantrips they can use as spell-like abilities, and get skill bonuses. Lashunta are a dimorphic species, and characters usually get to choose which one they will become (not just that the player gets to choose for their character, but the character themselves gets to choose). All lashunta are charismatic, while one subspecies is strong but somewhat oblivious, while the other is smart but fragile.
  • Kasatha: The kasatha originate from outside the Golarion system. They came to the system in a generational worldship intending to colonize, but found the system too densely populated to just take over a planet. So they stuck around and their ship is now a Pact World. Kasatha kind of look like Eldar with four arms. They tend towards being very traditionalist and consider melee weapons preferable to ranged ones. Mechanically, they get bonuses to Strength and Wisdom, but a penalty to Intelligence. They get bonuses to Culture, Acrobatics, and Athletics. Oh, and there’s the four arms thing, which literally lets them carry more.
  • Ysoki: These ratfolk are generally high-energy and technologically-focused. They have bonuses to Dexterity and Intelligence, but a penalty to Strength and have less HP than most other races. They are small, can carry things in their check pouches, have darkvision, and get bonuses to tinkering, hiding, and surviving.
  • Vesk: The vesk are definitely not a Pact World race. Indeed, these aggressive, martial reptilians were the impetus for the creation of the Pact. But the arrival of the Swarm threatened both the vesk’s star system and the Golarion system, resulting in a hesitant collaboration between the two. Vesk are strong and tough (including extra racial HP), but not as bright. They get extra benefit from armor, have enhanced vision, and natural weapons.
  • Shirren: Unlike the lashunta, the shirren are insectile. Indeed, they are a breakaway portion of the Swarm. Because of their history as part of a forced hive mind, they highly prize individual choice. They are tough and observant, but are considered less charismatic by other races. They have blindsense (vibration), work well as part of a team, have limited telepathy, and get bonuses to Culture and Diplomacy checks.

Next up is the theme, which is layered on top of the class. A character can be a priest (theme) whether or not they are a spellcasting mystic (class). A character can be a mercenary or a bounty hunter (themes) without being a soldier (class), or can be a soldier and a spacefarer (theme). The themes are ace pilot, bounty hunter, icon (as in, a celebrity), mercenary, outlaw, priest, scholar, spacefarer, and xenoseeker. Each theme gives +1 to a specific attribute, a bonus class skill at first level and a boost when using that skill (or some related skills), and unique abilities at levels 6, 12, and 18. For example, the Ace Pilot always has Piloting as a class skill, gets a bonus on Piloting checks, and has an easier time with Culture checks to know about starships and vehicles. A character can also be themeless, which provides generic bonuses.

As one might anticipate, a character’s class is the most mechanically significant mechanical choice at character creation. Class defines attack bonuses, saving throws, hit points and stamina points, skill points and where they are best spent, and weapon and armor proficiencies. The baselines for these are about 6 HP/SP a level, 4 skill points a level, a moderate base attack bonus, two good saving throws, and proficiency in light armor, basic melee weapons, grenades, and small arms. Every class also gives Weapon Specialization (bonus damage) at 3rd level for every weapon it gave proficiency with. Most classes have a class feature that every few levels lets the player choose an ability off of a substantial list, permitting a lot of customization. There are seven classes:

  • Soldier: The soldier will be instantly recognizable to any Pathfinder or D&D fan as the fighter of the system. They have increased HP/SP, the highest base attack bonus, and are proficient with pretty much every kind of weapon and armor – indeed they are the only class that is proficient with heavy armor, heavy weapons, and longarms (rifles). Soldiers receive a bonus combat feat every other level, and get to select gear boosts every four levels (such as a bonus when wearing armor or attack bonuses with certain weapon subcategories). Soldiers choose a primary (and eventually a secondary) fighting style, such as arcane assailant, armor storm, blitz, bombard, guard, hit-and-run, or sharpshoot (a soldier with the right specialization can also use powered armor). This fighting style gives bonuses every four levels. Soldiers also get enhanced ability to make extra attacks.
  • Envoy: The social character class (the “face,” if you will), the envoy is also very good with skills generally, gaining the highest available number of skill points per level and class features that make them even better at select skills. They envoy gains envoy improvisations every couple of levels. These abilities tend to involve social combat effects, such as taunting enemies or bolstering allies.
  • Operative: The operative is the other skill-heavy class, with some aspects traditionally associated with the rogue, like Evasion and a Sneak Attack variant (Trick Attack). Operative exploits are chosen every two levels, and include abilities such as a bonus combat feat, the ability to use skills untrained, or extra mobility. Each operative chooses a specialization, which gives several powers and a bonus exploit. The specializations include daredevil, detective, explorer, ghost, hacker, spy, and thief. Operatives aren’t proficient with grenades, but they are proficient with sniper rifles. They also have the potential to make more attacks than most other classes.
  • Mechanic: The mechanic is a “pet” class, with the pet being an AI installed either in a drone or in an exocortex (a brain implant with an AI) that levels up along with the mechanic (and is very customizable itself). The mechanic is also bonkers at breaking into computers and related systems. The drone AI tends towards combat, while the exocortex makes the mechanic even better at hacking. The mechanic chooses from a variety of mechanic tricks every two levels, such as a bonus ability when repairing starships or a visual data processor for enhanced perception.
  • Mystic: The mystic is, along with the technomancer, one of the two spellcasting classes. Neither spellcasting class is “arcane” or “divine,” but the mystic leans more towards what you might expect from a divine spellcaster (they have the healing spells, for example, while the technomancer has magic missile; their spellcasting is also based on Wisdom). Reading the descriptions, I almost wondered if mystics were Starfinder Jedi, as their powers are all about “connection with some force.” The concepts involved are broader than that, however, as a mystic’s “connection” is their philosophical power source. If the mystic draws their power from a deity, then this connection is probably related to that god, but the connection need not be divine in nature. Some of the connections are akashic, empath, healer, mindbreaker, overlord, and xenodruid (note that some of those connections are not exactly pleasant). Connections grant a few more spells known, and then a specific power every three levels. The mystic has a certain number of spells cast per day and spells known; there is no memorization of spells. The mystic also gains telepathic powers. The mystic has a few more skill points than is standard, but is not proficient with grenades and has subpar saving throws.
  • Technomancer: The other side of the spellcasting duo, technomancers are Intelligence-based, with fewer HP/SP and skills than the mystic. Technomancers have a spell cache for extra flexibility, and get a magic hack every few levels that can be used to modify spells or use spell slots for additional effects. Magical hacks include disrupting technological attacks, using a battery to fuel spellcasting, or changing any basic land type into another.
  • Solarian: The solarian is the most distinctive Starfinder class. The solarian’s concept is tied to the stars in their various stages of life, and the power of gravity, light, and heat. During combat, the solarian will either be in graviton mode or photon mode (and will fluctuate between the two), gaining access to particular powers depending on what mode they are in (the solarian will get to pick particular powers as they level up). In addition to these stellar modes, the solarian is also accompanied by a solar mote, a physical manifestation of their solar power. The solarian must choose whether this mote can become a solar weapon or can become solar armor. Of course, the solar equipment improves as the solarian levels. The solarian, like the operative and the soldier, has improved access to extra attacks. Solarians also join soldiers in having more HP/SP than other classes and in getting a better base attack bonus, and trade in their grenade proficiency for advanced melee weapons.

Archetypes exist in Starfinder like they do in Pathfinder, but work somewhat differently. Each base class has a standardized list of what it loses from an archetype when an archetype puts a feature in at that level, allowing archetypes to apply to any class (instead of being class-specific). There are only two archetypes presented, however, making this more something that will be expanded in later books than used directly out of this one. The two archetypes are the phrenic adept (psychics) and the Starfinder Forerunner (from the Starfinder Society).

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

Sunday, October 29, 2017 | By | Add a Comment

Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr – promising, or just another stale sci-dungeon crawler?

I have been playing my share of alpha games lately, and one game I find particularly addicting is Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr.  I am not particularly fond of alpha games, although there are sometimes those games that you just know have a better than average degree of growing into something fun and satisfying for a good many season.  And those are the games worth playing.  So where does Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr stand?  I, myself, have not been much of a Warhammer fan up until this point.  I never really purchased or played any other Warhammer games except Space Marine, which I thought was good, although I played it on a friends Xbox and just briefly before going home and playing more recent and better games on my PC.  The other Warhammer games are mostly strategic turn based games which I am not much of a fan of.  Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr on the other hand might have a more promising lifespan than the others, and here’s why:

In the game you are an Inquisitor which is a brutal and powerful character class from the Warhammer 40K universe that’s a part of a clandestine police force bent on the fanatical purging of demonic threats.  Set in a space sector created specifically for the game, Warhammer 40,000: Inquisitor – Martyr features two separate modes for you to sink your teeth into: a story mode and an open sandbox mode called the Inquisitorial Campaign.

While unorthodox for an action-RPG to be split in such a way, the decision was an intentional one to help differentiate the various aspects of Martyr’s gameplay, to better capture the spirit of the Inquisitor class while giving you a choice over what type of content you wish to tackle. Fortunately, you’re free to switch between them, but according to the game’s lead writer Viktor Juhász, it’s recommended to play story mode first.

“The story mode in Martyr is a traditional single player experience that serves as an overall introduction to the 40K universe, the Inquisitor as a class, and the new mechanics we are going to implement differently from the Van Helsing series,” Juhász told me during a recent interview. “But if you’d like, you can start with the Inquisitorial Campaign.”

 Compared to the story mode’s more contained structure–which puts you in an Alien-like horror scenario where you investigate an ancient spaceship–the Inquisitorial Campaign is a sandbox mode built for a more dynamic gameplay experience, focusing more on the various activities that the Inquisitor also participates in within the 40K universe.
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Playable with up to four players, the Inquisitorial Campaign allows you to freely explore the game’s massive sector, complete randomly-generated missions, and experience a narrative specifically triggered by the actions you take. Additionally, the game features a base building element where you can create your own personal fortress and invade ones built by other players online. But since the Inquisitorial Campaign offers you the freedom to explore the sector as you please, it lacks a difficulty curve, making it tougher than the story mode.

The game, which has been in Alpha testing since its release in February, has its drawbacks, including the fact that it is incredibly slow and choppy at times.  It makes you wonder if the game is on the verge of crashing from a lack of memory or lag.  Also the cover system, which they like to herald as a brilliant new thing to the action RPG, is very slow in reaction time and does very little to protect against large enemy fire which can decimate your cover objects that take damage until they are destroyed…sometimes hurting you in the process.

The game, however, is still in development, and I feel that there are benefits to some of the problems that the game currently has.  For one, it gives the game more of a challenge to advance, even for those who are expert action RPG gamers, and this allows novice gamers to get good at the game and start the early stages of the game with a very good foothold before the game is released in Beta.  Also, the game has a dedicated team of developers who have created a wonderful interface to record the issues with the game, and all of this is listed on redirected active forum pages which no doubt are checked regurlarly.  So you can count on improvements as time progresses within the games mechanics and speed.

So, what is so promising about Warhammer 40,000 Inquisitor – Martyr?  In my opinion, the fact that the players are apparently supposed to alter the game universe’s storyline, a promising PvP action MMORPG, building and customizing fortresses, a huge plethora of crafting and customizations including vehicles and weapons, and a challenging and much more difficult free multiplayer universe is what we have in store for this game.

Different from Warhammer games we have seen before?  I think so!

May the best Inquisitor win!

Gaming, online gaming, and pen and paper gaming

Gaming, online gaming, and pen and paper gaming

Thursday, March 24, 2016 | By | Add a Comment

Gaming, online gaming, and pen and paper gaming

Gaming, online gaming, and pen and paper gaming has such a wide audience and not every gamer is into or plays the same games as everyone else.  I am a gamer who enjoys games over many genres and that includes video as well as RPG or role playing games.  Mostly I am a huge fan of sci-fi based RPG’s.  One of my most favorite pen and paper RPG’s by far is Shadowrun.

Shadowrun is a role-playing game set in a fictional alternate universe.  Shadowrun combines cyberpunk and high fantasy to create a near future world where technology has advanced beyond our understanding, powerful mega corporations control everyday life, and magic and classical fantasy races have returned to the world.  The game also has a rich history and novels to go along with the game to keep the player inspired when not actually involved in a “campaign” or role playing group.  There are currently several video games also related to the RPG which are rapidly becoming more and more in depth with all of the elements of the original game and with expansions as well.

The fourth edition of Shadowrun uses a point-based character creation system. Earlier editions and later in the fifth edition, used a priority-based system with point-based character creation as an advanced option. Priorities are divided into race, magic, attributes, skills, and resources.  All things that do not explicitly fall under the first four classifications, including contacts in third and earlier editions of Shadowrun, are given cash-equivalent values to be bought with resources.

Shadowrun characters are created with contacts, friends and acquaintances who serve as key nodes in the character’s social network and who will often help the character out. Through the contacts system, players may uncover information that their characters cannot independently acquire.  Additionally, players can often negotiate for the use of skills that their characters do not themselves have, a radical departure from most role-playing games.

Although the skill system is freeform, certain combinations of skills and equipment work well together.  This combination of specialization in skill and equipment is known as an archetype.   So whether you want to be a street samurai with magic skills, or an adept with fighting skills, you can mix things up however you want with certain restrictions and consequences of course.

Check out the video above for more on learning the world of Shadowrun for your first time.